Gayle Faught, PhD

COURSES TAUGHT

Dr. Faught teaches undergraduate Developmental PsychologyMethod and Design in the Behavioral SciencesInfant and Child PsychologyPsychology of Adolescence, and Adult Development, as well as graduate-level Developmental Psychology.


EDUCATION

Ph.D., The University of Alabama, 2017, Developmental Psychology


RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Faught’s research interests include a variety of cognitive processes in Down syndrome, including attention, memory, and language. She is currently working on a project exploring how these processes are affected by aging and early signs of dementia in Down syndrome. She also serves on Master’s thesis committees.


PUBLICATIONS

Faught, G. G., & Conners, F. A. (in press). Modeling the relationships among sustained attention, short-term memory, and language in Down syndrome. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Conners, F. A., Tungate, A. S., Abbeduto, L., Merrill, E. C., & Faught, G. G. (2018). Growth and decline in language and phonological memory over two years among adolescents with Down syndrome. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities123(2), 103-118. doi: 10.1352/1944-7558-123.2.103

Yang, Y., Faught, G. G., & Merrill, E. C. (2017). Parent reports of wayfinding activities by their children with Down syndrome. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability. doi: 10.3109/13668250.2017.1284309

Faught, G. G., Conners, F. A., Barber, A. B., & Price, H. R. (2016). Addressing phonological memory in language therapy with clients who have Down syndrome: Perspectives of speech-language pathologists. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 51(6), 703-714doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12241

Faught, G. G., Conners, F. A., & Himmelberger, Z. M. (2016). Auditory and visual sustained attention in Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 53-54, 135-146. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2016.01.021

Faught, G. G., Leslie, A. D., & Scofield, J. (2015). The effects of source unreliability on prior and future word learning. First Language35(6), 431-445. doi: 10.1177/0142723715609229