Professor and two students utilizing engineering equipment

Mechanical Engineering Course Descriptions

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Computer Science (CSCI)

CSCI A125 Introduction to Computer Science. (3) (Prereq: Placement above MATH A104, or MATH A104, with a grade C or better, or consent of department). The course is designed to help students with no prior exposure to computer science or programming learn to think computationally and write programs to solve useful problems. The focus of the course is on problem analysis and the development of algorithms and computer programs in a modern high-level language. This course is for students who want to pursue major in computer science.

CSCI A145 Introduction to Algorithmic Design I. (4) (Prereq: CSCI A125 with a grade of C or better for all applied computer science majors. MATH A111 with a grade of C or better for all other majors). This is the first course in the two-semester programming course sequence for students majoring in computer science. It teaches program design, coding, debugging, testing, and documentation using good programming style in Java, and provides a foundation for further studies in computer science. Three hours of lectures and three hours of laboratory per week.

CSCI A146 Introduction to Algorithmic Design II. (4) (Prereq: CSCI A145 with a grade of C or better) A continuation of CSCI A145. Rigorous development of algorithms and computer programs; elementary data structures. Three hours of lectures and three hours of laboratory per week.

CSCI A185 Computer Applications and Programming (3): (Prerequisite: MATH A108 or MATH A108L with grade of C or better, placement higher than MATH A108 or MATH A108L or consent of the department). This course introduces systematic computer problem solving using a procedural language. Emphasis is placed upon algorithm development and program implementation. The course is intended for students to learn computer Visual programming. Emphasis on the fundamentals of structured design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation. Includes language syntax, data and file structures, input/output devices, and files. This course also provides exposure to applications such as spreadsheets, database management, and web-page design leading to an advanced level of competency. 

CSCI A209 Topics in Computer Programming. (3) (Prereq: consent of the department) Programming and application development using selected programming languages. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. 

CSCI A210 Introduction to Computer Organization (3) (Prereq: CSCI A145 with a grade of C or better). This course covers computer organization and architecture with a focus on how the various components of computer systems fit together and interact. The goal of this course is to obtain a working knowledge of the lower levels of abstraction of a computer system. Students will learn how to program at both the assembly level and the instruction set architecture level and obtain an in-depth understanding of how computers work by considering the design of the levels of abstraction and the relationship between the levels. 

CSCI A215 Ethics and Professional Issues. (3) Covers the impact of computer use on society, the ethical use of software, and the protection of intellectual property rights. The responsibility of professionals will be discussed in the context of the IEEE/ACM professional code of ethics. 

CSCI A220 Data Structures and Algorithms. (3) (Prereq: MATH A174 and CSCI A146 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department.) Theory and advanced techniques for representation of information. Abstract data types: lists, stacks, queues, sets, trees, and graphs. Algorithms for sorting, searching, and hashing. 

CSCI A225 Web Development (3) (Prereq: CSCI A145 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to web development. The course will explore prevailing technologies in three main components of web applications: client, server, and data. It will also provide practical experiences with large-scale interactive websites development project. 

CSCI A255 Introduction to Information Security (3) (Prereq: CSCI A125 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to basic security concepts and principles of information security. Topics will include history of information security; overview of system security, software security, and network security; security management. 

CSCI A275 Physics Engine Integration. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 146 with a grade of C or better). Few computer gaming companies write their entire code from scratch. They often use commercially available physics engines which control the way objects interact with the environment. They control characteristics such as gravity, collision detection, fabric movement, wind, etc. Understanding how to apply the engines to a scenario is a key skill. 

CSCI A285 Introduction to Cryptography (3) (Prereq: CSCI A146, CSCI A255, MATH A122, and MATH A174 with a grade of C or better for all). This course introduces fundamental topics in cryptography, including symmetric cryptography, historical ciphers, the data encryption standard, the advanced encryption standard, and asymmetric cryptography. It also covers topics in number theory for public-key cryptography, RSA cryptosystem, and the RSA digital signature scheme. 

CSCI A320 Object-Oriented Programming (3) (Prereq: CSCI A145 with a grade of C or better). An in- depth study for the object-oriented programming paradigm. Topics include abstraction, encapsulation, information hiding, classes, inheritance, polymorphism, and the object-oriented programming applications for 2-D graphics, user interface design, events, exceptions, multithreading, multimedia, and animations.

CSCI A325 System Level Programming (3) (Prereq. CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better). The course is designed to help students with no prior exposure to system programming. System Programming refers to writing code that prioritizes operating system support for programmers. The course will cover basic concepts of systems programming, system programming language(s) and application of those language(s) to systems level problems. The course will focus on programming constructs that are closely aligned with the architecture of a digital computer. Shells and scripting. System-level programming in the C/C++ language. Software development tools and techniques. 

CSCI A330 Programming Language Structures. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better). Formal specification syntax and semantics; structure of algorithms; list processing and string manipulation languages; statement types, control structures, and interfacing procedures. 

CSCI A340 Mobile Application Development (3) (Prereq: CSCI A146 with a grade of C or better or consent of the Dept.). The study of basic concepts and programming skills of mobile computing. Topics include user interfaces, layouts, events and event handling, graphics, images, animations, multimedia, 2D game development, data persistence, and networking. 

CSCI A350 Computer Graphics (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a C or better). This course is an introduction to computer graphics, covering the fundamental mathematical and computational concepts underlying computer graphics. The course consists of discussions of the basic theoretical concepts and practical programming with OpenGL. Students will learn the architecture of OpenGL, color, input, geometric transformations, 3D graphics, shading, rasterization, and some other techniques. 

CSCI A360 Software Engineering (3) (Prereq; CSCI A146 with a grade of C or better) This course introduces basic knowledge about software engineering, including principles and techniques of software design, software construction, software testing, and software maintenance. For students who took CSCI A240, this class will not count as a technical elective.

CSCI A375 Introduction to Haptics. (3) Adding force feedback, or haptics, is a method to make an AR/VR/SG scenario even more realistic. Haptics can include the ability to feel the weight of a virtual object being lifted, the torque on a steering wheel, or the resistance when contacting a rigid object. Understanding how to make a scenario physically interact with the user will lead to more immersive scenarios. 

CSCI A376 Graph Theory for Computer Science. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A146 and MATH A174 with a grade of C or better). An algorithmic introduction to Graph Theory and its applications. Topics include fundamental concepts for graphs, connectivity, matrices of graphs, trees, paths and cycles, matchings, graph colorings, and planar graphs. 

CSCI A399 Independent Study. (3-9) (Prereq: consent of the department) Directed independent project. 

CSCI A411 Operating Systems. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better) Basic concepts and terminology of operating systems. Process implementation, synchronization, memory management, protection, resource allocation, system modeling, pragmatic aspects, and case studies. 

CSCI A415 Data Communication and Computer Networks. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better). The study of concepts and components in data communications and computer networks. Topics will include data transmission, reference models, common network protocols, network applications and technologies. 

CSCI A425 Network security (3) (Prereq. CSCI A415 with grade of C or better). Study of network security principles and defensive technologies. Topics include basic network security concepts, network intrusion detection and prevention, traffic flow analysis, segregation, security management and secure protocols usage. 

CSCI A450 Introduction to Image Processing (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a C or better). This course introduces the basic concepts and general methods of digital image processing. The theories, algorithms, and processing techniques in both the spatial and frequency domains will be discussed. Students will gain understanding of the fundamental mathematical transformations used in digital image processing and practical skills of implementing the processing algorithms with computer programming. 

CSCI A492 Topics in Computer Science. (3) (Prereq: consent of the department) Study of selected topics in computer science. To be offered as a lecture course on a "demand basis" only. 

CSCI A515 Ethical Hacking (4) (Prereq: Departmental Permission). This course teaches how computer techniques can be exploited, and along with how those techniques can be selected and countered (e.g., scanning, mapping, password attacks, and more advanced attacks if time permits). 

CSCI A520 Database System Design. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better) Database organization; design and use of database management systems; database models, including network, hierarchical and relational; data description languages, data independence and representation. 

CSCI A521 Database Programming for Computer Science (3) (Prereq: CSCI A520 with a grade of C or better). A Programming course in large-scale relational database environment using host languages. Database design and implementation of online applications using some of the programmatic extensions to Structured Query Language (SQL) supported by top-of-the-line enterprise Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). Topics covered in this course include database programming using open architectures, embedded and dynamic query languages, procedural extension of query languages, stored procedures and triggers, data transformation techniques to enhance interoperability of data, and introduction to extensible markup data definition and retrieval languages.

CSCI A525 Secure Software Engineering (3) (Prereq: Departmental Permission) This course introduces the fundamentals for constructing secure software by applying security principles to the software development processes. Software vulnerabilities and possible attacks that exploit them will be covered. 

CSCI A545 Cyber Defense and Digital Forensics (3) (Prereq: Departmental Permission) This course introduces the tools and techniques for monitoring and preventing illegal accesses to computer systems that contain confidential or sensitive information. In addition, this course also introduces digital forensic tools and techniques to collect, analyze, document, and present evidence for malicious activities or computer-related crimes. 

CSCI A550 Design and Analysis of Algorithms. (3) (Prereq: grade of C or better in CSCI A220 and MATH A141). An introduction to the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms in computer science. The algorithmic design paradigms such as the greedy method divide and conquer, dynamic programming, backtracking, and branch-and-bound. The analyses of algorithms from different areas such as searching, sorting, graph theory, combinatorial optimization, and computational geometry. An introduction to the theory of NP-completeness. 

CSCI A562 Numerical Methods. (3) (Prereq: grade of C or better in MATH A242 and MATH A544 or consent of instructor, and a working knowledge of programming) An introduction to numerical methods used in solving equations and systems of equations, numerical integration, differential equations, interpolation, and approximation of functions. 

CSCI A591 Capstone Seminar I (3) (Prereq: Senior standing in Applied computer Science, CSCI A220 with a grade of C or better, CSCI A360 with a grade of C or better). Each student is required to do an in- depth study of some topic or a team-based software design project in a student's final year of study. Lecture topics include project planning, software requirements analysis, design, specification, ethics, and social impact. Selection, specification, and feasibility study of an open-ended design project to be completed in CSCI A592. 

CSCI A592 Capstone Seminar II (3) (Prereq: CSCI A591 with a grade of C or better). Continuation of CSCI 591. The final project design, computer system implementation, testing, verification, and validation of results will be completed by the end of the semester. Both written and oral reports are to be provided. 


Mathematics (MATH) 

MATH A102 Contemporary Mathematics. (3) Contemporary mathematical thinking is emphasized through a broad study of topics which could be used in making personal and professional decisions. Topics will be taken from the following: mathematical reasoning and problem-solving strategies, the nature of sets and set operations, principles of logic and logical arguments, systems of measurement, and basic concepts of graph theory. Appropriate technology will be used to support the course. 

MATH A103 Mathematics in Society. (3) Contemporary mathematical thinking is emphasized through the study of consumer finance and financial management, counting methods and probability, and an introduction to statistics and its uses in today’s world. Appropriate technology will be used to support the course. MATH A103 and MATH A104 may be taken in any order. 

MATH A104 Mathematics for Practical Purposes. (3) The study of number theory, set theory, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic and exponential functions and their uses in the real world. Appropriate technology will be used to support the course. MATH A103 and MATH A104 may be taken in any order.

MATH A108 Applied College Algebra. (3) (Prereq: B or higher in MATH A104 or by appropriate criteria as listed on the USC Aiken Math Placement Chart or by consent of department). Study of functions and graphical methods with the aid of technology. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, and other functions; solving equations; properties of logarithms and exponents. Emphasis will be on using algebra as a language for expressingproblems and using algebraic and graphical methods for solving problems, data analysis, and other applications. Required graphing calculator specified in course schedule. (Four hours per week typically divided into 2 hourslecture and 2 hours collaborative learning, discussion, and exploratory activities.) 

MATH A108L Applied College Algebra with Lab (3) (C or higher in MATH A104 or by appropriate criteria as listed on the USC Aiken Math Placement Chart or by consent of department). An in-depth version of MATH A108 intended to develop the necessary algebraic skills by providing additional support through smaller class sizes and more contact hours. (Five hours per week typically divided into 2 hours lecture and 3 hours collaborative learning, discussion, and exploratory activities.

MATH A111 Precalculus Mathematics I. (3) (Prereq: by placement, or grade of C or better in MATH A108, or consent of the department; may be taken concurrently with MATH A112). Topics in algebra specifically needed for MATH A141, A142, and A241: the study of equations and inequalities, graphs, functions and inverse functions, conic sections, zeros of polynomials, and systems of equations and inequalities. 

MATH A112 Precalculus Mathematics II. (3) (Prereq: by placement, or grade of C or better in MATH A108, or consent of the department; may be taken concurrently with but not before MATH A111) Topics in trigonometry specifically needed for MATH A141, A142, A241: trigonometric functions and their applications. Includes the study of complex numbers, vectors and polar coordinates. 

MATH A122 Survey of Calculus with Applications. (3) (Prereq: by placement, or MATH A108 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department). An intuitive approach to the concepts and applications of differential calculus through the study of rates of change and their interpretations, using data-driven, technology-based modeling. Topics include linear, quadratic, cubic, exponential, and logistic models for discrete data; rates of change; calculating derivatives; interpreting derivatives as rates of change; relating first and second derivatives to graphs; and optimization. (Not intended for those who plan to take more than one calculus course). 

MATH A135 AppliedMath Seminar. (1) A brief (1 credit hour) introduction, using case studies, to show how applied mathematics is used in government and industry. 

MATH A141 Calculus I. (4) (Prereq: by placement, consent of the department, or MATH A111 and MATH A112 with a grade of C or better). Differential calculus and introductory integral calculus concepts and skills needed for the successful study of upper-level science, mathematics, and engineering courses. Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives of the fundamental functions, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to definite integrals. The course has 5 contact hours per week. 

MATH A142 Calculus II. (4) (Prereq: MATH A141 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). This course covers integral calculus and infinite series concepts and skills beyond those dealt within MATH A141 (Calculus I) that are needed for the successful study of upper-level science, mathematics, and engineering courses. Topics include: substitution methods for indefinite and definite integrals, applications of definite integrals including finding solid volumes, arc lengths, surface areas of revolution and simple applications in physics, separable differential equations, integration by parts, trigonometric substitutions and other techniques to deal with integrals of trigonometric functions and rational functions, improper integrals, sequences, infinite series, convergence and divergence of number series and power series, and Taylor series. The course has contact hours per week.

MATH A170 Finite Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: by placement, or MATH A108 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department). Matrices, systems of linear equations, linear programming, permutations and combinations, elementary probability and statistics, mathematics of finance.

MATH A174 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (3) (Prereq: by mathematics placement above MATH A111, completion of either MATH A111 or MATH A170 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department). Basic mathematics needed for the study of computer science: Propositions and predicates; mathematical induction, sets, relations, Boolean algebra, automata, grammars and languages, computable functions. 

MATH A221 Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics I (3). The meaning of number, fundamental operations of arithmetic, the structure of the real number system and its subsystems, elementary number theory. Open only to students in elementary education, early childhood education, or others pursuing add-on certification in elementary education. Students who are not graduating in the elementary early childhood or special education programs cannot take this course for general education mathematics credit. MATH A221 and MATH A222 may be taken in any order. 

MATH A222 Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics II. (3) (Prereq: MATH A108 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). Informal geometry and basic concepts of algebra. Open only to students in elementary education, early childhood education, or others pursuing add-on certification in elementary education. Students who are not graduating in the elementary early childhood or special education programs cannot take this course for general education mathematics credit. MATH A221 and MATH A222 may be taken in any order. 

MATH A225 Mathematical Software (3) (Prereq: CSCI A145 with a C or better and MATH A142 with a C or better). Introduction to the use of mathematical software packages and other computer algebra systems in applied mathematics, engineering, and statistics. 

MATH A241 Calculus III. (4) (Prereq: MATH A142 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). The course introduces geometry of the space and concepts, techniques and applications of multivariable calculus. Topics include vectors, scalar and vector products, lines and planes, vector functions, partial derivatives, chain rules, directional derivatives and gradient, tangent planes and normal lines, total differentials, multiple integrals, iterated integrals, change of variable, and polar and spherical coordinates. Other related topics on integrals will be covered as time permits. 

MATH A242 Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) (Prereq: MATH A142 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). First order and linear higher order ordinary differential equations, systems of equations, Laplace transforms. 

MATH A325 Advanced Mathematical Programming (3) (Prereq: MATH A225 with a grade of C or better). This course emphasizes the use of mathematical software packages to implement and solve complex (linear, discrete, and continuous) mathematical models. Assessment of the validity of these models using real-world data will also be discussed. 

MATH A344 Linear Algebra for Computer Science and Engineering (3) (Prereq: MATH A122 or MATH A141 with a grade of C or better). This course introduces preliminary concepts and basic computational techniques of linear algebra that are important to science and to different branches of computer science and engineering. Contents include vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, systems of equations, inversion, matrix decomposition, and other topics applicable to computer science and engineering.

MATH A399 Independent Study. (3-9) (Prereq: consent of the department) Directed independent project. 

MATH A420 History of Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: MATH A142 and MATH A174 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department) A survey of the development of mathematics from ancient times to thepresent with emphasis on the development of algebra, geometry, and calculus, and the contributions of mathematics to advances in science and technology. 

MATH A492 Topics inMathematics. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of the department) Study of selected mathematical topics. To be offered as a lecture course on a "demand basis" only. 

MATH A503 Geometry for Middle and High School/General Mathematics Teachers. (3) (Prereq: by examination placement above MATH A112, MATH A221 or MATH A222 with a grade of C or better, or MATH A111 and MATH A112 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department). Topics include methods of proofs, concepts and selected theorems of Euclidean geometry with a concentration on proofs/problem-solving using geometric concepts with selected software. Open only to Education majors. 

MATH A518 Industrial Mathematics I. (3) (Prereq: MATH A174 and MATH A544 and STAT A509 with a grade of C or better). The construction of mathematical models for applied problems using discrete mathematics and statistics. This course emphasizes the use of advanced mathematical methods for the solution of "real world" problems arising from an industrial setting. 

MATH A519 Industrial Mathematics II. (3) (Prereq: MATH A242 and MATH A544 with a grade of C or better). The construction of mathematical models for applied problems in terms of ordinary and partial differential equations. This course emphasizes the use of advanced mathematical methods for the solution of "real world" problems arising from an industrial setting. 

MATH A531 Foundations of Geometry. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). The study of geometry as a logical system based upon postulates and undefined terms. The fundamental concepts of Euclidean geometry developed rigorously based on a set of postulates. Some topics from non-Euclidean geometry. 

MATH A544 Linear Algebra. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). Vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, systems of equations, inversion, characteristic equations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, quadratic forms, Jordan and rational forms, functions of matrices. 

MATH A546 Introduction to Algebraic Structures. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 and MATH A174 with a grade of C or better in both, or consent of the department). Sets, mappings, equivalence relations. Elementary properties of semi-groups, groups, rings, fields. 

MATH A550 Advanced Multivariable Calculus. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department). Vector calculus of n-variables; implicit and inverse function theorems; extremum problems; Lagrange multipliers; Taylor series; Jacobians; multiple integrals; line integrals; vector fields; surface integrals; theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss. 

MATH A552 Complex Variables. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 with a grade of C or better). Complex integration, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, Taylor and Laurent series expansions, applications. 

MATH A554 Introduction to Analysis. (3) (Prereq: MATH A241 with a grade of C or better) Theory of functions of one variable; limits; continuity; differentiation, integration; Taylor series; power series; sequences and series of functions.

MATH A590 Capstone I (3) (Prereq: Senior standing in Applied Math or consent of the department). Each student is required to do an in-depth study of some topic to be presented orally and in writing in class, and to participate in the discussion and debate of topics presented byother students. Topics will be tied together under a common theme chosen by the faculty. 

MATH A591 Capstone II. (3) (Prereq: MATH A590 with a grade of C or better). Continuation of MATH A590. Conclusion and presentation of the in-depth study or research project started in MATH A590. 


Statistics (STAT) 

STAT A201 Elementary Statistics. (3) (Prereq: MATH A108 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the department). An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistical methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, tests of hypotheses, estimation, simple linear regression, and correlation. To give students from throughout the university a non-calculus-based introduction to the application of modern statistical methods including descriptive and inferential statistics. Appropriate technology will be used to support the course. Primarily for students in fields other than Mathematics who need a working knowledge of statistics. (Four hours per week typically divided into two hours of lecture and two hours of collaborative learning, discussion, and exploratory activities. 

STAT A509 Statistics. (3) (Prereq: MATH A141 with a grade of C or better; or in both MATH A122 and one of MATH A170, STAT A201, or PSYC A225 with a grade of C or better; or consent of the department). Basic probability and statistics with applications. Data collection and organization, elementary probability, random variables and their distributions, estimation and tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance, applications and use of a statistical package. 

STAT A510 Statistical Quality Assurance. (3) (Prereq: STAT A509 with a grade of C or better). Basic graphical techniques and control charts. Experimentation in quality assurance. Sampling issues. Other topics include process capability studies, error analysis, estimation, and reliability. 


Engineering (ENCP) 

ENCP A101 Introduction to Engineering I. (3) (Prereq: MATH A104 with a grade of C or better or placement beyond MATH A104). Engineering problem solving using computers and other engineering tools. 

ENCP A102 Introduction to Engineering II. (3) (Prereq: MATH A108 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to basic concepts in engineering graphics as a means of communication, including orthographic projections, descriptive modeling, and computer graphics. 

ENCP A200 Statics. (3) (Prereq: MATH A141 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to the principles of mechanics. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Distributed forces, centroids and centers of gravity. Moments of inertia of areas. Analysis of simple structures and machines. A study of various types of friction. 

ENCP A260 Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A200 with a grade of C or consent of the department). Basic concepts of stress and strain; Stress and Strain transformation concepts. Basic developments for stresses, tension, torsion, axial load, and pressure. Deformations of elastic relationships between stress and strain. 

ENCP A290 Thermodynamic Fundamentals. (3) (Prereq: MATH A142 with a grade of C or better). Definitions, work, heat and energy. First law analyses of systems and control volumes. Second law analysis.

ENCP A300 Engineering Seminar. (1) A brief introduction, using guest speakers and case studies, to show how engineering is used in industry. This seminar course will be taken twice by students in the program. Mechanical engineering majors in their first spring semester will take this course and then will take it again in the spring semester before completing the senior capstone. This will lead to upperclassmen taking this course at the same time as students early in the program. Each spring, both groups of students will take this class concurrently in the same room and be exposed to the same speakers, workshops, and information sessions. This approach provides an insight into internships and curriculum and creates a bridge between the cohorts allowing for mentorship and interaction between the two student groups. 

ENCP A301 Introduction to Applied Numerical Methods. (3) (Prereq: MATH A141 with a grade of C or better, Coreq: MATH A142). Introduction and application of linear algebra and numerical methods to the solution of physical and engineering problems. Techniques include iterative solution techniques, methods of solving system of equations, and numerical integration and differentiation. 

ENCP A310 Dynamics. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A200 with a grade of C or better). Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies. Kinetics of particles with emphasis on Newton’s second law; energy and momentum methods for the solution of problems. Applications of plane motion of rigid bodies. 

ENCP A316 Control Systems. (3) (Prereq: MATH A242 with a grade of C or better, ELCT A221 with a grade of C or better). An introduction to closed-loop control systems: development concepts, including transfer function, feedback, frequency response, and system stability by examples taken from engineering practice. Also covered are introductions to control systems design methods and programmable logic controllers (PLC’s). 

ENCP A327 Design of Mechanical Elements. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A260 with a grade of C or better). Design against static failure and fatigue failure of structural members and machine parts: design and selection of components including fasteners, welds, shafts, springs, gears, bearings, and chain drives. 

ENCP A332 Kinematics. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A310 with grade of C or better). The application of vector and graphical analysis for the determination of positions, velocities and accelerations of planar linkages used in modern machinery. 

ENCP A334 Quality Control and Planning. (3) (Prereq: STAT A509 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to quality management philosophies, tools, and approaches. Six Sigma philosophy, roadmap, tools, and techniques of planning and executing quality improvement programs and the LEAN continuous improvement approach that focuses on reducing waste. Application of Design for Six Sigma approach to design or improve products and processes. 

ENCP A354 Heat Transfer. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A 290 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A 360 with a grade of C or better, and MATH 242 with a grade of C or better; Coreq: ENCP A354L). One- and two-dimensional steady and unsteady conduction; free and forced convention; boiling and condensation; heat exchangers. 

ENCP A354L Heat Transfer. (1) (Coreq: ENCP A354). The laboratory course is associated with the experimental analysis of linear conduction; radial conduction; conduction of fluids, fins, free and forced convection; and radiation. This course is designed to be taken with ENCP A354. 

ENCP A360 Fluid Mechanics. (3) (Prereq: Math A241 with a C or better; ENCP A200 with a grade of C or better). Mechanical engineering applications of fluid statics and dynamics. Conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Similitude and dimensional analysis, open channel flow, lift and drag. Introduction to turbulent flow. 

ENCP A361 Instrumentation, Measurements, and Statistics. (3) (Prereq: STAT 509 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A260 with a grade of C or better, PHYS A211 with a grade of C or better, and PHYS A212 with a grade of C or better; Coreq: ENCP 361L). Principles of measurement, analysis of data, experimental planning. Correlations of experimental data, experimental variance, and uncertainty analysis. 

ENCP A361L Instrumentation, Measurements, and Statistics. (1) (Coreq: ENCP A361). This laboratory course is associated with operating principles of common instrumentation of hardness, pressure, temperature, stress, strain, and electrical measurements. Students will also apply statistical skills and interpret the results. This course is designed to be taken with ENCP A361. 

ENCP A368 Mechatronics. (3) (Prereq: CSCI A125 with a grade of C or better, ELCT A221 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A260 with a grade of C or better). Introduction to the principles of integrating mechanical, electrical and computer engineering disciplines within a unified framework towards designing mechatronic systems; Fundamental overview of mechatronics (sensors, signals, actuators, microprocessors, and models of mechatronic systems); Experimental exercises using microcontrollers. 

ENCP A371 Engineering Materials. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A260 with a grade of C or better). Structure and properties of engineering metals, ceramics, and polymers; atomic bonding, crystalline structures, and microstructures; mechanical behavior and deformation mechanisms; processes for controlling structures and properties; corrosion. 

ENCP A377 Manufacturing Processes. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A371 with a grade of C or better). Basic principles of metal processing; applied mechanics of metal cutting and forming; cost analysis of manufacturing operations. 

ENCP A380 Introduction to Systems Engineering. (3) (Prereq: MATH A242 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A334 with a grade of C or better). An integrated introduction to systems methodology, design, and management. Overview of systems engineering as a professional and intellectual discipline, and its relation to other disciplines, such as operations research, management science, and economics. Survey of selected techniques in systems and decision sciences, including mathematical modeling, decision analysis, risk analysis, and simulation modeling. 

ENCP A394 Thermodynamic System Design and Analysis. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A290 with a grade of C or better). Design and analysis applied to vapor and gas power cycles, refrigeration and heat pump systems, thermodynamic relations, ideal gas mixtures, psychometric humid air analysis, and combustion processes. 

ENCP A399 Independent Study. (1-9) (Prereq: Department permission).

ENCP A492 Topics in Engineering. (3) (Prereq: Departmental permission) Study of selected topics in engineering. To be offered as a lecture course on a “demand basis” only. 

ENCP A498 Capstone Design I. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A310 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A361 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A371 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A334 with a grade of C or better, ENCP A327 with a grade of C or better; Coreqs: ENCP A316 and ENCP A380). Lecture topics include design specifications and planning, innovation, economic factors, safety, reliability, ethics, and social impact. Selection specification, and feasibility study of an open-ended design project to be completed in ENCP A499.

ENCP A499 Capstone Design II. (3) (Prereq: ENCP A498 with a grade of C or better; Coreqs: ECON A421, PHIL A324, and BADM A494). Design for manufacturability, ergonomic and aesthetic considerations, prototype construction and testing, statistical methods/design of experiments, ethics/product liability and social/environmental impact. The final engineering design (specifications, drawings, bill of materials, including assessment of economics) will be completed by the end of the semester. Both written and oral reports are to be provided. 


Electrical Engineering (ELCT) 

ELCT A221 Circuits. (3) (Prereq: MATH A142 with a grade of C or better). Linear circuit analysis.